Departamento de Física

Facultad de Ciencia
Universidad de Santiago de Chile

Seminario de Física - Lunes 20 de Agosto - 3:30pm - Viviana Clavería

Fecha: 
08/20/2018 - 15:30
Título: "The shape of red blood cells"
 
Viviana Clavería del Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CBS Montpellier
 
Abstract:
In the literature it is stated that the normal human red blood cell (RBC) has at equilibrium the shape of a flattened biconcave disc about 8 μm in diameter. Under different chemical and physical stresses this normal shape can deform in a systematic way to form the known stomatocytes (cup) and echinocytes (spiculate) shapes. To understand these transformations, it is necessary to understand the structure of the red-cell membrane and to model it in terms of the variables which characterize its mechanical properties. The so called Bilayer-Couple Model satisfactory reconstruct RBCs shapes considing as main parameters the spontaneous curvature, the area difference between the leaflets on the plasma membrane and the unstressed RBC reference shape. This last one has been considered to be an oblate ellipsoid. Through details experiments in 2D and 3D, I have elucidated that not only discocytes exist on RBC population, but defleated discoidal shapes are highly present. In this seminar, I will present to the audience the red blood cells as an object characterized by mechanical properties, the relationship among those properties and the actual model behind it. But most importantly, I will present that through numerical simulations, we have shown that the defleated discoidal shapes (recently highlight by our experiments) can only be modeled by chosen a prolate ellipsoidal reference shape proposing an alternative model parameter to the present one. I will also discuss the possible impact of this new finding on the explanation of define RBCs flow behavior.
 

Lunes 20 de agosto del 2018 a las 15:30 hrs.

Sala de Conferencias, 3er Piso

Departamento de Física

Universidad de Santiago de Chile

Carrera: 
Doctorado en Ciencia con Mención en Física